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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 136

Paediatric renal diseases in a rural tertiary hospital in north-western Nigeria: pattern and outcome


Department of Paediatrics, Paediatrics and Child Health, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Submission07-Aug-2017
Date of Acceptance08-Nov-2017
Date of Web Publication17-Jan-2018

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Mahmood D Al-Mendalawi
PO Box 55302, Baghdad Post Office, Baghdad
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jesnt.jesnt_17_17

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How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Paediatric renal diseases in a rural tertiary hospital in north-western Nigeria: pattern and outcome. J Egypt Soc Nephrol Transplant 2017;17:136

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Paediatric renal diseases in a rural tertiary hospital in north-western Nigeria: pattern and outcome. J Egypt Soc Nephrol Transplant [serial online] 2017 [cited 2018 Jul 18];17:136. Available from: http://www.jesnt.eg.net/text.asp?2017/17/4/136/223410



I have read with interest the study by Abdullahi on the pattern and outcome of pediatric renal diseases in a rural tertiary hospital in north-western Nigeria [1]. The author found that the commonest renal disease was acute glomerulonephritis reported in 61.8% of cases followed by nephrotic syndrome (NS) in 23.5%, and urinary tract infection in 9.8%. Others were urolithiasis, pelvic kidney, and Wilms’ tumor [1]. Surprisingly, no case of HIV − associated nephropathy (HIVAN) was reported. I presume that the actual prevalence of HIVAN might be underestimated in the study. My presumption is based on the following three points. First, to my knowledge, pediatric HIV infection is a worrisome health problem in Nigeria. Although there is a difference in the geographical distribution of HIV infection in Nigeria, recent data on the exact national pediatric HIV prevalence are not yet present. The available data pointed out that it constituted 5.7–8.3% of the hospitalized children in certain localities [2],[3]. Second, the clinical spectrum of pediatric HIVAN in Nigeria was found to be protean with predominance of acute kidney injury, NS, and chronic kidney failure [4]. Third, various grades of proteinuria are a common laboratory manifestation in many renal diseases. However, it is considered an early manifestation of HIVAN, and 12–20.5% of the HIV-infected Nigerian children were found to have proteinuria [5],[6]. Concisely, I presume that good number of pediatric HIVAN might be misdiagnosed, and they were categorized under the headings of acute glomerulonephritis and NS in Abdullahi’s study. Viral overload and CD4 count estimations were solicited to be done in the studied cohort. If these measurements were done and they revealed underlying HIV infection, the pattern of pediatric renal diseases in Abdullahi’s study might be altered.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Abdullahi UI. Paediatric renal diseases in a rural tertiary hospital in north-western Nigeria: pattern and outcome. J Egypt Soc Nephrol Transplant 2017; 17:38–40.  Back to cited text no. 1
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2.
Oniyangi O, Awani B, Iregbu KC. The pattern of paediatric HIV/AIDS as seen at the National Hospital Abuja Nigeria. Niger J Clin Pract 2006; 9:153–158.  Back to cited text no. 2
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3.
Onankpa B, Airede L, Paul I, Dorcas I. Pattern of pediatric HIV/AIDS: a five-year experience in a tertiary hospital. J Natl Med Assoc 2008; 100:821–825.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]    
4.
Ademola AD, Asinobi OO, Oladokun RE, Ogunkunle OO, Okoloz CA, Ogbole GE. Kidney disease in hospitalised HIV positive children in Ibadan, south west Nigeria. Afr J Med Med Sci 2012; 41:221–230.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.
Esezobor CI, Iroha E, Onifade E, Akinsulie AO, Temiye EO, Ezeaka C. Prevalence of proteinuria among HIV-infected children attending a tertiary hospital in Lagos, Nigeria. J Trop Pediatr 2010; 56:187–190.  Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]    
6.
Eke FU, Anochie IC, Okpere AN, Eneh AU, Ugwu RO, Ejilemele AA et al. Microalbuminuria in children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Niger J Med 2010; 19:298–301.  Back to cited text no. 6
    




 

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