• Users Online: 51
  • Home
  • Print this page
  • Email this page
Home About us Editorial board Ahead of print Current issue Search Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 16  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 89-96

Interleukin-10 gene polymorphism and graft outcome in live-donor kidney transplantation


1 Department of Nephrology, Urology and Nephrology Center, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt
2 Department of Immunology, Urology and Nephrology Center, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt
3 Department of Internal Medicine Department, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Khaled Mohamed Mahmoud
Department of Nephrology, Urology and Nephrology Center, Mansoura University, Mansoura 35516
Egypt
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1110-9165.197381

Rights and Permissions

Background Polymorphism has been described in many immunoregulatory molecules that play a role in the rejection process. It has offered a possible explanation for the individual difference in rejection susceptibility and renal graft survival independent of other risk factors. The aim of this work was to study the impact of the interleukin-10 (IL-10) cytokine gene polymorphism on the clinical course and outcome of a renal transplant. Materials and methods This work included 50 transplant recipients treated with a sirolimus-based immunosuppressive regimen for IL-10 cytokine gene polymorphisms. After transplantation, patients were classified into two groups: in group A, patients (12 patients) received sirolimus, tacrolimus, and steroid and in group B, patients (38 patients) received sirolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, and steroid. The results were correlated with rejections (acute and chronic) and patient and graft survival. Results In our study, we found no impact of IL-10 on the incidence and degree of acute rejection episodes, incidence of chronic allograft nephropathy, pathological changes in protocol biopsies, graft function, and graft and patient survivals. Conclusion On the basis of this work, we concluded that there is no impact of IL-10 cytokine gene polymorphisms on the clinical course and outcome of a renal transplant. Genes other than IL-10 could probably be involved as key molecules in graft function.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed109    
    Printed4    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded38    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal